Animal Medical Center of Southern California

24/7 General + Emergency Care (310) 575-5656

2340 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles, California

Animal Medical Center

Animals and people have similar neural pathways for the development, conduction, and modulation of pain.

Pain Management.

Animals and people have similar neural pathways for the development, conduction, and modulation of pain. This biological similarity makes the expression of both acute and chronic pain comparable. Like humans, dogs and cats develop myopathies and neuropathies that lead to muscle and neurological pain and discomfort. Other painful conditions, which may be similarly expressed include ear infections, dental conditions, sinus pain, skin lesions, and the pain of acute and chronic, repetitive trauma. Untreated pain decreases quality of life in all patients and prolongs recovery from surgery, injury, or illness. Today, with a better understanding on how pain develops and is perpetuated, pain management has become an essential part of high quality and compassionate patient care in the veterinary field. Providing adequate pain management helps pets recover faster, improving the human-animal bond and the pet’s overall well-being.

Different kinds of pain

When a negative, painful insult is encountered, the body’s endocrine system produces substances such as cortisol, catecholamine, and other inflammatory mediators that alter normal physiologic parameters. As a result of the release of these substances into the general circulation, substantial changes occur at the tissue level including decreased oxygen delivery to tissues, increased cellular metabolic demands, impaired immune function, increased risk of infections, delayed wound healing, prolonged convalescence, and cardiovascular stress.

In the past, pain was most commonly classified either as acute or chronic. Recently, a newer approach has been to consider pain as adaptive or maladaptive.

Adaptive pain is a normal response to tissue damage. It includes all types of pain involving the release of inflammatory mediators that will cause heat, redness, swelling, pain, and loss of function of the injured area. Inflammation is a major component of pain and can be present both in postoperative/trauma patients and in chronic pain states such as osteoarthritis.

If adaptive pain is not properly managed, it will eventually result in physical changes in the spinal cord and brain, which will lead to maladaptive pain. In maladaptive pain, the central nervous system becomes more sensitive and the thalamus, which serves as a relay station for nerve impulses from the periphery to the cortex, becomes a spontaneous pain generator. The adjustment from thinking of pain as either acute or chronic to adaptive or maladaptive makes it easier to understand why pain can be so difficult to control in certain patients.

How do I know my pet is in pain?

There are numerous signs that an animal can exhibit while experiencing pain:

  • They can fail to exhibit normal behavior, as evidenced by being more lethargic, with perhaps a decreased appetite or decreased grooming tendencies, especially in cats.
  • They may express an abnormal behavior, such as an increase in vocalization, aggression, altered posture and/or facial expression, hiding (cats especially), restlessness, and inappropriate elimination.
  • An increase in body tension and reaction to touch, or hyperpathia, is also consistent with an animal experiencing pain in a specific injured body area or region. A distinct change in physiologic parameters such as an elevated heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and/or pupilary dilation is also indicative of pain.
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    What can I do to help my pet?

    Understanding the circumstances that can lead to the development of pain may help anticipate and properly manage the emergence of pain as a clinical condition. Attention must be paid to the development or presence of unusual bumps, scrapes, bruises, or sensitivities. Any change in an animal’s desire or ability to run, jump, play, or otherwise ambulate normally must be evaluated.

    Simple basic lifestyle changes such as controlled exercise regimes and weight management can help reduce joint pain and stress.

    Providing favorable environmental conditions to help prevent or alleviate pain and discomfort such as ensuring easy access to litter boxes, soft bedding, non slippery surfaces, limited access to stairs, and “warming up” your pet appropriately prior to exercise will help reduce the need for pharmacologic intervention in many cases.

    How do we manage pain?

    At our hospital, we utilize both pharmacological and a non-pharmacological treatments for pain management. Your doctor will recommend the best way to individually manage your pet’s painful condition.

    Pharmacological intervention:

    Prior to an elective surgical procedure, appropriate opioids will be administered. Based upon the type of procedure performed, the addition of local anesthetics, epidurals, and steroidal or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory will provide pre and intra-operative comfort and a better postoperative recovery period. Throughout the anesthetic recovery period, hospitalization and the immediate post-operative recovery period at home, additional non- steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids or opioid patches will be provided to your pet.

    For maladaptive types of pain not associated with an elective procedure, numerous different options may be chosen by your veterinarian.

    NSAID’s and Corticosteroids are the drugs of choice for many of the inflammatory conditions resulting in pain, acting by inhibiting substances released at multiple levels along the biochemical pain pathway.

    Topical anesthetics are useful to manage well-delineated painful areas such as small burns or urine scalding.
    When aberrant pain is refractory to traditional analgesics, specific drugs like Gabapentin, which acts on the central nervous system, may be required to restore normal central nervous system transmission and control pain and discomfort.

    However, many patients with long term chronic, intermittent pain often benefit from the combination of pharmacological as well as non pharmacological therapy.

    Non-Pharmacological intervention:

    The newly developed high power Class IV lasers generate visible and invisible light beams that are absorbed as light energy by cells (photobiostimulation). This results in the activation of biological reactions, which have been shown to result in an increase in circulation to the damaged area thus creating an optimal healing environment.

    Acupuncture has long been recognized by renowned medical associations for its analgesic properties. One of the ways acupuncture works is by slowly releasing an animal’s own opioid-like substances (endorphins) from the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves to help alleviate pain at its source.

    Rehabilitation therapy is crucial to help the patient return to normal function or to help improve overall body condition. Rehabilitative techniques include heat and cold therapy, passive range of motion exercises, stretching, balancing exercises, massage, joint mobility, and controlled walking exercises.

    Nutrition or “food therapy” is a science that selects food or herbs customized to each individual based upon their inborn tendencies, age, species, personality, and disease process. A specifically formulated diet can help prevent or help in the management of many painful conditions including but not limited to certain skin diseases, osteoarthritis, cancer, and gastrointestinal problems.

    Nutraceuticals (glucosamine, chondroitin, msm, creatine) may decrease joint inflammation and assist in cartilage repair. Additional products, which have demonstrated to be of help by decreasing inflammation and modifying the progression of osteoarthritis and therefore pain,  include the omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and chondroprotective agents such as polysulfated glycosaminoglycans (Adequan).

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About Animal Medical Center

The Animal Medical Center of Southern California is devoted to providing the best medical, surgicalm and emergency critical care available in veterinary medicine. As important as our medical expertise is, we believe that excellent care combines state-of-the-art veterinary medicine and surgery with a focus on compassion and respect for your pet and for your family.

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